Question: Which Nasal Sprays Cause Rebound Congestion?

Can I just stop using Flonase?

Takeaway.

Stopping using Flonase (fluticasone) nasal spray abruptly typically won’t cause issues.

If you start taking Flonase while taking oral steroids, your doctor may gradually decrease your dose of the oral steroids to avoid withdrawal symptoms..

How do I stop rebound congestion?

If you have rebound congestion, stop using the spray and wait. Call your doctor if you need help. To prevent rebound congestion, use decongestant spray for no more than a few days in a row.

How can I unblock my nose?

Here are eight things you can do now to feel and breathe better.Use a humidifier. A humidifier provides a quick, easy way to reduce sinus pain and relieve a stuffy nose. … Take a shower. … Stay hydrated. … Use a saline spray. … Drain your sinuses. … Use a warm compress. … Try decongestants. … Take antihistamines or allergy medicine.

What happens if you use too much nasal decongestant?

Nasal spray addiction is not a true “addiction,” but it can lead to tissue damage inside the nose. This can result in swelling and long-term stuffiness that leads to further use and overuse of the spray. In some cases, a person may need to undergo additional treatment, and possibly surgery, to correct any damage.

Can nasal spray cause more congestion?

Decongestant nasal sprays (DNSs) provide immediate relief by shrinking swollen blood vessels in your nasal passages. This reduces the inflammation and helps you breathe easier. DNSs are supposed to be used for a maximum of three days. If you use them longer than that, they can cause rebound congestion.

How do I get rid of rebound nasal congestion?

Rebound congestion treatment “One can use a nasal steroid (such as Flonase) to help limit the symptoms while the body recovers. In severe cases, an oral steroid can be prescribed, which may help.” Dr. Gels adds that saline spray might help to reduce the inflammation.

Does Flonase weaken your immune system?

Fluticasone can weaken your immune system, making it easier for you to get an infection or worsening an infection you already have or recently had. Tell your doctor about any illness or infection you have had within the past several weeks.

Can I stop Flonase cold turkey?

Some conditions (such as asthma, allergies) may become worse when the drug is suddenly stopped. If you suddenly stop taking the drug, you may also have withdrawal symptoms (such as weakness, weight loss, nausea, muscle pain, headache, tiredness, dizziness).

What medications cause rebound congestion?

Rhinitis medicamentosa (or RM) is a condition of rebound nasal congestion suspected to be brought on by extended use of topical decongestants (e.g., oxymetazoline, phenylephrine, xylometazoline, and naphazoline nasal sprays) and certain oral medications (e.g., sympathomimetic amines and various 2-imidazolines) that …

When should you stop using Flonase?

Talk to your child’s doctor if you are concerned or if your child is between 2 and 11 years of age and needs to use FLONASE Allergy Relief for longer than 2 months a year. If you feel any of these symptoms, stop using FLONASE® Allergy Relief and see a doctor right away.

How long does it take to recover from rhinitis Medicamentosa?

However, because it is a simple pharmacodynamic phenomenon, patients should inevitably improve once receptor densities have returned to their predrug state. This typically takes 1 to 2 weeks, and in the intervening period the patient may benefit from oral decongestants to get through the periods of severe congestion.

How can I get rid of allergic rhinitis permanently?

There is no cure for allergic rhinitis, but the effects of the condition can be lessened with the use of nasal sprays and antihistamine medications. A doctor may recommend immunotherapy – a treatment option that can provide long-term relief. Steps can also be taken to avoid allergens.

Does Flonase cause rebound congestion?

No, FLONASE Allergy Relief does not cause a rebound effect. Some nasal decongestant sprays may cause your nasal passages to swell up even more when you use them too often or for longer than their label says you should (three days). This is sometimes called a “rebound effect.”

How long does rebound congestion last?

And if you continue to use your nasal spray, this congestion can last for weeks or even months. There isn’t a test to formally diagnose rebound congestion. But if rhinitis medicamentosa is to blame, your symptoms should improve after you stop using the medication.

Who should not use Flonase?

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: recent nose problems (such as injury, ulcers, surgery), infections (including tuberculosis, herpes eye infection), certain eye problems (glaucoma, cataracts), liver disease.