Quick Answer: What Is The Best Allergy Medicine To Take At Night?

Why do my allergies get worse at night?

If you suffer from seasonal pollen allergies, this could be why you sneeze more at night.

Additionally, allergens like pollen stick to your clothes, skin and hair during the day.

This can lead to a buildup of these allergens in your home, causing your symptoms to be worse in the evenings..

Can’t sleep at night due to allergies?

A runny or stuffy nose can make it difficult to fall asleep and stay asleep. A good way to relieve your nighttime symptoms is by clearing out your nasal passages just before you go to bed. You can use a saline spray if you wish. You won’t need to be concerned about side effects, as saline sprays are drug-free.

Do antihistamines keep you awake at night?

While some over-the-counter antihistamines can cause drowsiness, routinely using them to treat insomnia isn’t recommended. Antihistamines, mainly used to treat symptoms of hay fever or other allergies, can induce drowsiness by working against a chemical produced by the central nervous system (histamine).

Which is better Claritin or Zyrtec?

Zyrtec has a quicker onset of action compared to Claritin and may be more effective than Claritin in reducing allergy symptoms, according to one clinical trial. However, cetirizine, the active ingredient of Zyrtec, has been shown to produce more drowsiness than loratadine.

What allergy medicine helps you sleep?

Sleep aids: The optionsDiphenhydramine (Benadryl, Aleve PM, others). Diphenhydramine is a sedating antihistamine. … Doxylamine succinate (Unisom SleepTabs). Doxylamine is also a sedating antihistamine. … Melatonin. The hormone melatonin helps control your natural sleep-wake cycle. … Valerian.

What helps with allergies at night?

Here are a few ways to help you get a full night’s sleep despite your allergies:Keep the house closed up. If possible, keep windows and outside doors shut during pollen season, especially during the daytime. … Take your allergy medication at night. … Be aware of pollen counts. … Beware of your own clothing. … Keep clean.

What month is allergy season over?

“Tree pollen season is usually at the beginning of spring in March, April, and the first half of May while the grass pollen season is typically mid-May through early-to-mid-July,” he says. “And the ragweed season is usually from mid-August until that first frost.”

What can I drink for allergies?

If you feel stuffy or have postnasal drip from your allergies, sip more water, juice, or other nonalcoholic drinks. The extra liquid can thin the mucus in your nasal passages and give you some relief. Warm fluids like teas, broth, or soup have an added benefit: steam.

What helps allergies at home?

What Steps Can I Take to Control Indoor Allergens?Control dust mites. Keep surfaces in your home clean and uncluttered. … Vacuum once or twice a week. … Prevent pet dander. … Prevent pollen from getting inside by keeping windows and doors closed. … Avoid mold spores. … Control cockroaches. … References.

Will Zyrtec keep you awake at night?

Zyrtec D (Cetirizine / Pseudoephedrine) relieves allergies and congestion without causing daytime sleepiness. It can keep you up at night if you take it too close to bedtime. The antihistamine (Cetirizine) in Zyrtec D (Cetirizine / Pseudoephedrine) causes less drowsiness than other medications like Benadryl.

Is it better to take allergy meds at night?

So taking your 24-hour allergy medications before going to bed means that you’ll get the maximum effect when you need it the most. “Taking your allergy medication at night assures that it will be circulating in your blood stream when you most need it, early the next morning,” Martin says in a news release.

How do you stop allergies immediately?

Try an over-the-counter remedyOral antihistamines. Antihistamines can help relieve sneezing, itching, a runny nose and watery eyes. … Decongestants. Oral decongestants such as pseudoephedrine (Sudafed, Afrinol, others) can provide temporary relief from nasal stuffiness. … Nasal spray. … Combination medications.